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February 2015

Steps To Successful Grain Storage

grain storage

Stored grains can be heavily damaged by insects if they are not properly conditioned and protected. Small grains, including wheat, are harvested in spring and stored through the hottest and most humid months of the year. Reducing the likelihood of insect problems in stored grain begins with cleaning equipment that will be used to harvest, handle and store the grain. ... Read More »

Keep Weevils Away

Maize weevils can destroy stored corn crops from the inside out. For Georgia corn producers, chances of an insect infestation in grain storage are much higher in late summer or early fall. A University of Georgia (UGA) entomologist says keeping corn cool and dry is the key to keeping weevils away. “The temperatures are usually warm during harvest, so we ... Read More »

Control Weeds Prior To Planting: Burndown Timing and Options

As fields begin to dry and the extended forecast predicts better conditions for weed management strategies, burndown applications will be going out. Research has shown that burndown applications need to be applied four to six weeks prior to planting to prevent physical competition between weeds and the crop as well as to reduce the chance of damage from insects such ... Read More »

Market Outlook: Tips to Increase Efficiency and Profitability

Editor’s Note: Reports in this month’s Corn South Market Outlook are from Mark Welch, Texas AgriLife Extension economist, with Regional agronomist, Brandon A. Dillard, of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, offering four points to help producers increase efficiency and profitability in 2015. The opinions and recommendations expressed are solely those of the authors and are intended for educational purposes only. ... Read More »

The Only Constant Is Change

Amanda Huber, Editor

I read a quote that describes the business of farming: “It’s funny how day by day, nothing changes. But when you look back, everything is different.” Year by year, you seem to do pretty much the same thing – acreage and crops may change with rotations, weather is always a questionable factor and farm policy changes every few years. Otherwise, ... Read More »